Ep 98. Jeanine Leane: Education, representation and unasked questions

Talking with Jeanine Leane gave me so much to think about. We covered what it was like to study and write in Canberra in the 1980s, the role of writing groups in her writing process, the difference between racism and white privilege, the understanding (or lack thereof) of Indigenous Australians amongst settler critics and publishers, and the questions she never gets asked in interviews.

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Ep 97. What makes poets lucky

My favourite poem – ever – is Dorothy Porter’s ‘Lucky’. In this episode I talk about why it matters so much to me and what it is to have someone who’ll make you coffee while you’re trying to decide where the hell to put that line break.

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Ep 96. Eddie Paterson: The trashy and the profound

…I kind of wish I’d written Eddie Paterson’s Redactor. There. Now you know.

In this episode I get to hear about how Eddie made this hilarious and moving collection of found poetry, who he was writing to and why, and about his artistic influences. Billy Collins and Carly Rae Jepsen are also mentioned.

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Ep 94. Claire Albrecht: Boosh at the End of the World

This didn’t feel like my first conversation with Newcastle poet Claire Albrecht. We started out with The Mighty Boosh and Atwood, moved on to Claire’s chapbook pinky swear, covered guilt and the writing life, the enduring comfort of Dawson’s Creek and Claudia Rankine. Somewhere in there, I remembered to introduce myself.

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Ep 93. David Brooks: Insomnia and wild ducks

David Brooks’ The Balcony was one of the first poetry books I truly connected with. In this episode I look closer at two of his poems and draw some parallels with another of my favourites, Jane Kenyon.

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Ep 92. Adam Ford: ‘And are you proud of me?’

‘Fuck you Adam Ford’ is a tough way to introduce yourself to your favourite poet. But that’s what my cousin, Bridget Mackey, ended up doing.

This is the story of a Canberra girl who fell in love with a poetry book – and accidentally ended up living inside it.

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Ep 91. Kate Lilley’s anti-pastoral

To kick off Poetry Says for 2019 I take a look at Kate Lilley’s ‘Pastoral’ – a funny, biting poem about maths class, movies and refusing to write about the seasons. ‘Pastoral’ is from Kate’s 2018 book Tilt, which just took out the Victorian Premier’s Literary Award for poetry.

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Ep 90. A poem for broken friendships

I’ve been looking for John Russell McCarthy’s Friendship Broken for a while now. It reads more like Luke Davies that something published in 1938. I hope it speaks to you as much as it does me.

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